Presentations

Schedule a Presentation

UWC Presentations is a specialized project group providing cross-disciplinary writing support for undergraduate writers as well as specialized pedagogical training for the instructors and TAs of undergraduate courses.

We’re available for presentations from Monday-Friday, 8am-6pm.
Please request at least two weeks in advance.

Introduction to the UWC (10-15 min)

Showing your writing to a stranger can be intimidating. To help students feel more comfortable about coming to the UWC, many instructors invite one of our consultants to their class to give a ten-minute presentation. This presentation provides all the essential details about the center (hours, location and policies) and allow students to ask questions about how we can meet their individual needs. If requested, we can provide copies of the UWC brochure and a “Getting the Most from your visit to the UWC” handout which details what students should expect when visiting.

Avoiding Plagiarism (45-50 min)

This presentation advises students on how to research and write in an academically responsible way. Specifically, it defines plagiarism and academic dishonesty; discusses why academic honesty is important; and advises students on some best practices for avoiding plagiarism in their own writing. This presentation does not cover all the discipline- or style-specific rules for citing sources. It is intended to be generally applicable to any academic or professional discipline that adheres to Western notions of intellectual and academic honesty.

Transitioning from High School to University-Level Writing (45-50min)

This presentation introduces students to some of the salient expectations and conventions of university-level writing. It explores the intellectual and stylistic standards that are unique to writing in college and gives students an opportunity to practice applying these standards to a sample piece of writing. It also dispels certain “myths” that new college students tend to belive about writing, such as “good writers write quickly and effortlessly.”

Writing Abstracts (45-50min)

This presentation introduces students to a particular genre of academic and professional writing that they’re probably not familiar with: the abstract. In particular it explains what abstracts are, why people write them, who reads them, and why they are useful and important in various contexts. In addition, this presentation also advises students on some strategies and tips for generating abstract content and composing abstracts.

Writing in Process (45-50min)

This presentation focuses on the basics of writing college-level papers. It is applicable to writing in all academic genres and all disciplines. We walk students through strategies for writing planning, for creating and structuring papers, and for revising papers. This presentation is particularly effective for new college students and for students in Substantial Writing Component courses or other courses that require at least one major writing assignment.

Writing Lab Reports (45-50min)

This presentation discusses best practices for planning, creating, and revising lab reports in the hard and social sciences. It covers the different sections of a report (title, abstract, materials and methods, etc.) and details the goals of each. It also advises students on cultivating the concise, direct, and active sentence-level style that is particularly important in science writing.

Writing Personal Statements (45-50min)

This presentation helps students develop and write effective personal statements for graduate school, medical school, law school and beyond. The presentation covers topics such as “what is the admissions committee looking for?” and provides a framework for students’ writing whether applying to professional schools or individual graduate programs.

Writing Research Papers (45-50min)

This presentation is applicable to research papers that support thesis statements or answer non-experimental research questions. It outlines how to plan, create, structure, and revise research papers, with a focus on constructing arguments. It closely resembles the Writing in Process presentation, but focuses more closely on successful paragraphing, supporting claims, and integrating evidence.

Writing Resumes and Cover Letters (45-50min)

In addition to a presentation on Writing Personal Statements, we also offer a presentation on constructing resumes and cover letters. This presentation advises writers on how to construct visually and rhetorically effective resumes, and how to write cover letters to accompany those resumes.

Please request at least two weeks in advance.

Graduate Services at UWC (15-20 min)

This presentation introduces the UWC’s new services for graduate students, including consultations, writing groups, retreats, and workshops. It is available for graduate seminars, orientation events, and informal graduate student groups. Printed brochures on UWC Graduate Services are also available upon request.

Transitioning from College Writing to Graduate Writing (45-50 min)

Designed for graduate students, this presentation addresses many of the common challenges of transitioning to graduate-level writing, including: working in new genres, determining your audience’s expectations, and tackling long, complex projects. We suggest solutions to these challenges and introduce the UWC’s services for graduate writers. This presentation is available for graduate seminars, orientation events, or informal student-led groups.

Writing Groups (45-50min)

Designed for graduate students, this presentation introduces the benefits of writing groups, which provide structure, accountability and encouragement. The presentation includes an overview of the UWC’s group services for graduate writers, strategies for asking for help with writing and giving feedback on others’ work, and ideas for how to start your own writing group. This presentation is available for graduate seminars, orientation events, or informal student-led groups.

Avoiding Plagiarism (45-50 min)

This presentation advises students on how to research and write in an academically responsible way. Specifically, it defines plagiarism and academic dishonesty; discusses why academic honesty is important; and advises students on some best practices for avoiding plagiarism in their own writing. This presentation does not cover all the discipline- or style-specific rules for citing sources. It is intended to be generally applicable to any academic or professional discipline that adheres to Western notions of intellectual and academic honesty.

Writing Lab Reports (45-50min)

This presentation discusses best practices for planning, creating, and revising lab reports in the hard and social sciences. It covers the different sections of a report (title, abstract, materials and methods, etc.) and details the goals of each. It also advises students on cultivating the concise, direct, and active sentence-level style that is particularly important in science writing.

Writing Lab Reports (45-50min)

This presentation discusses best practices for planning, creating, and revising lab reports in the hard and social sciences. It covers the different sections of a report (title, abstract, materials and methods, etc.) and details the goals of each. It also advises students on cultivating the concise, direct, and active sentence-level style that is particularly important in science writing.

Writing Personal Statements (45-50min)

This presentation helps students develop and write effective personal statements for graduate school, medical school, law school and beyond. The presentation covers topics such as “what is the admissions committee looking for?” and provides a framework for students’ writing whether applying to professional schools or individual graduate programs.

Writing Literature Reviews (45-50min)

Designed for graduate students at any stage, this presentation focuses on situating your project within a scholarly conversation. We discuss the purposes and characteristics of literature reviews, address common challenges, and introduce research-based strategies for synthesizing and responding to other scholars’ viewpoints. Originally developed for the UWC’s summer Dissertation Boot Camp course, this presentation is available for graduate seminars or informal student-led groups.

Please request at least two weeks in advance.

Peer Review (45-50min)

This workshop is a version of the Revising Essays and Research Papers workshop that has been modified for peer review. It is applicable to thesis-driven essays and papers that focus on non-experimental research. During a Peer Review workshop, a UWC presenter will lead your students through a peer review process in which they will read a partner’s paper and review it for the clarity and coherence of its thesis, main claims, evidence, analysis, and conclusion. Students should have a peer review partner and should come prepared with 1) a paper copy of their draft to share with their parter and 2) writing utensils in at least three different colors.

Sentence Clarity (45-50min)

This combination presentation and workshop offers simple and straightforward advice for writing clear, direct sentences without resorting to complicated grammar rules. It then offers students a structured opportunity for practicing this advise while editing actual prose. Students can bring in material that they are writing for class, and thus have a chance to edit their work for clarity in real time. Or the UWC can provide a set of sample sentences for students to use as practice material.

Revising Essays and Research Papers (45-50min)

This workshop is applicable to thesis-driven essays and papers that focus on non-experimental research. Specifically, it asks students to locate and think critically about the essential elements of their papers: introduction, thesis/research question, body paragraphs, claims, evidence, conclusion. It also provides tips for sentence level editing and clean-up. Students should come prepared with 1) a paper copy of their draft and 2) writing utensils in at least three different colors.

Revising Lab Reports (45-50min)

This workshop is applicable to papers that focus on experimental, objective-driven research and that contain the typical lab report structure (title, abstract, materials and methods, etc.) Specifically, it asks students to locate and think critically about the essential elements of their papers, such as their objectives, background and context, main claims, etc. Students should have a peer review partner and should come prepared with 1) a paper copy of their draft and 2) writing utensils in at least three different colors.

Time Management for Researchers: Developed by University Writing Center Director Trish Roberts-Miller, this presentation is a succinct and useful guide for scholars who must immerse themselves in integrating a subject, while not becoming distracted or unfocused.
please request at least two weeks in advance

Improving Responses to Student Writing (45-50min)

In the University Writing Center, many of our consultants and administrative staff members are also instructors at UT Austin. Accordingly, in addition to supporting student writers, we also offer support for instructors and teaching assistants who are responsible for responding to student writing. Our 45-50 minute Improving Responses to Student Writing presentation outlines strategies that instructors and teaching assistants can use to maximize the effectiveness of the feedback they give their students. Please request your Improving Responses to Student Writing presentation at least two weeks in advance.

Presentation and Workshop Training Sessions (45-50min)

UWC Presentations can train instructors and TAs to deliver any of our presentations or workshops, and can provide supplemental materials, such as Peer Review worksheets or UWC Handouts, to help with the presentation or workshop. Presentation and Workshop Training Sessions are ideal for instructors of multi-section courses who want to offer their students UWC writing support while simultaneously providing their TAs with extra pedagogical training. Simply decide what presentation or workshop you’d like the training to focus on and request the training session at least two weeks in advance.

Writing in Process

Avoiding Plagiarism

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Presentation FAQ

Yes! UWC Presentations has recently expanded its services to include graduate classes. We now offer writing support to graduate students as well as undergraduates and the instructors and TAs who work with them.
Of course! We welcome requests from student leaders and faculty alike. So whether you are interested in a presentation for a class, a student organization, a FIG group, etc., we will always do our best to accommodate your request.
UWC Presentations can modify our existing presentations according to reasonable requests. However, we typically do not develop new presentations from scratch to target the needs of a specific class. If you have very specific concerns you would like addressed during a presentation or workshop, indicate this fact and explain your concerns in the space provided in our online request form. The Committee Coordinators will be in touch with you to further discuss your concerns.
We’ve found that students get the most out of presentations and workshops when their TA or instructor is present to field class- and assignment-specific questions, and to explain how a particular presentation or workshop is specifically relevant to class material. So, we ask that the requesting instructor or TA be present during the presentation.
We will try, but may not be able to. UWC Presentations delivers between 100-150 in-class presentations every year. We do our best to accommodate every instructor’s first date/time preferences, but ask for a second preference in case we cannot accommodate the first.
We typically cannot accommodate multiple repeat presentations for multi-section courses. Instead, you can request one presentation for a general lecture meeting, or we can train your TAs so they can deliver the presentation for their respective sections.
We do our best to accommodate all presentation requests, but we may not be able to accommodate requests sent on short notice. If you can, please request Introduction to the UWC presentations at least one week in advance, and all other presentations or workshops at least two weeks in advance.
We typically accommodate presentations and workshops during regular business hours (8AM-6PM). If you want to request a presentation or workshop outside of those times, please submit your request at least three weeks in advance. We will do our best to accommodate the request, but may not be able to.
Ideally, students will have note-taking materials during a presentation. For revision and peer review workshops, they should have paper copies of their most recent drafts and writing utensils in three different colors.